Highlights from Haiti: 31 October 2014

 

We plan to post links to keep you aware of what is happening in Haiti.

Any links to external Web sites provided by RHFH’s web pages are provided as a courtesy. They should not be construed as an endorsement by RHFH of the content or views of the linked materials.

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Thank You Volunteers!!

They come one, two . . . five at a time and they are valuable and so appreciated.

Erin VanStone

The volunteers that come to RHFH bring in needed supplies. Thanks Danielle!

Danielle donations

One helps in the ER/Wound care with our nurse Yanick. (Cindi)  One takes blood pressures for hours. (Paulette)

team 13

The Pastor visited and prayed with people waiting for clinic. (Keith)

The doctor sees patients during the clinic hours . . .

team 11

…and then checks all the children in the ICU and RC. (Dr. Ken)

team 6

Our weekly weighing and measuring the children was easier with all the help. Each child tenderly touched and held.

team 5

They hold kids – little do we know how much love the kids feel by this.

Holly and Jolynn

Tena and Merlanda

Jeff diapered more kids than he had ever in his life :)

team 4

The Pastor went to a local youth group and shared with them. (Keith)

A new bulletin board – how many Presbyterians does it take to make a bulletin board :)

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A HUGE THANK YOU to all of our recent volunteers!!!

team 15

If you would like to be a part of RHFH by volunteering, fill out the Volunteer Application and send to volunteer@realhopeforhaiti.org and tell us a little about yourself.

team 14

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Cholera Alert

We are happy to say that this has been a year where cholera had seemed to stay at a low rate. There were even whispers that the UN was hoping to say cholera was gone from Haiti towards the end of this year.  Unfortunately, that just isn’t so.  In August, there was a small spike that was over in about 2 weeks.  September was slow, mostly due to little rainfall.  On October 9th, we started seeing a spike in cases in the Cabaret and Arcahaie communes.  This spike is cholera is being felt in many places all over Haiti.  There isn’t much about it on the news, but it is happening.

cholera 6

During this month, we have treated 70 patients that are suspected cases of cholera.  We are averaging about 20 inpatients each night.

cholera 3

There are others that come to our center with typhoid and other diarrheal illnesses.  We treat those people also, but those are not counted in our cholera numbers.  This month, there have been 42 patients like this.

cholera 5

There was a 15 year old girl that died within 5 minutes of entering.  We got the IV in, but it was too late.  We have heard that there were 2 others that died on the way to the cholera treatment center.

cholera 1

We are working with MSPP (Minister of Health), government hospitals & clinics, the National Lab, German Red Cross, French Red Cross, and Doctors Without Borders to coordinate care, education, prophylaxis for families, transfers, disinfecting houses, and distribution of aquatabs, soap, and other hygiene items to prevent the spread of the bacteria.

cholera 4

With your help we have treated 8266 patients.  Thank you for your support!  It is still needed and appreciated.

cholera 2

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Guest Post by Joanne and Jenna Cottrill

My daughter, Jenna, and I have been volunteering at RHFH since 2011. It is difficult to put into words our feeling about what we have experienced at Real Hope for Haiti.  With each visit we are continuously learning more about Haitian culture, about ourselves, about loving others, bravery and sacrifice, and about Jesus and miracles.  We are addicted!  Each time we say “good-bye” it is so difficult.  Haiti is constantly on our minds and in our prayers every day.  We count down the months and days until the next visit.

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We have made so many friends and been inspired by so many people.  Haitians are the strongest people we know, and we are touched over and over by their acts of kindness and generosity.  They are our heroes!  Each night at RHFH we fall into bed tired, cheeks kissed, tanned, sweaty, full of love (loving and being loved by kids), and with a prayer on our lips for their healing—to be FULL every night like our hearts could burst and can’t wait to do it all again the next day.

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We have seen lots of pain that poverty brings.  We now have a responsibility—we can never claim ignorance.  Like the words of the Sara Groves song “I saw what I saw and I can’t forget it”, it is now our responsibility to willingly do whatever God has planned for us to help alleviate this poverty.

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Lori and Licia and all the staff are so self-sacrificing and loving to the people they care for.  They stretch themselves beyond what we would willingly do, to love, serve and present Christ to those they contact each day.  God is working in Haiti, in Cazale, and at RHFH.  He was working there before we went and after we leave.  To just be a part of something this amazing for a short time, to experience miracles, serve wherever/whenever we can to help ease the workload, to be inspired and learn, to love and be loved—THAT is why we love going to RHFH.

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Highlights from Haiti: 24 October 2014

 

We plan to post links to keep you aware of what is happening in Haiti.

Any links to external Web sites provided by RHFH’s web pages are provided as a courtesy. They should not be construed as an endorsement by RHFH of the content or views of the linked materials.

Older Entries »

ERIMENE

She is 6 years old and weighs 22 1/2 pounds. She was referred to us by Community Health Initiative.   She has 4 livings siblings and 1 that die from fever. The family lives in a 2 room home made of wood and tarps.  They do not have running water at their home or a flush toilet, not even an outhouse.  They get their water from a source that is about a 15 walk from their home.   Erimene’s mama buys items in bulk and resells them for a profit.  Her papa is a farmer and grows beans and corn in his gardens.  She has been losing weight for several months now and began showing signs of kwashiorkor about 1 month ago.  The day she was admitted she had a plate of rice to eat and the day before she had a banana and juice.  They traveled 6 hours by foot and tap-tap to arrive at the clinic.  The family’s average monthly income is $51.00US.  She was started on the f-75 therapeutic milk and then transferred to the medika mamba program.

Erline (2)

JEAN LUCKSON

He is 7 years old and weighs 25 pound. He was referred to us from Community Health Initiative.  He has 4 living siblings and 2 that died when they were newborns.  His papa died several years ago.  His mama has gardens of beans and corn.  The family lives in a 2 room home made of woods, clay and brush.  They buy their water from a vendor that lives close to their home.  His mama tells us he has been losing weight for about 3 months now.  The day he was admitted he had soup to eat and the day before he had a plate of rice. The family’s average monthly income is $113US.  They traveled 6 hours by foot and tap-tap to arrive at the clinic.  His mama believes that there just is not enough food for everyone and that is why he is losing weight.  He was started on the F-75 therapeutic milk and then graduated to the medika mamba program.

Jean Luckson (2)

ANDREMENE

She is 4 years old and weighs 20 1/2 pounds.  She was in our outpatient nutrition program and abandoned treatment.  In a few months time she became increasingly worse and began to develop signs of kwashiorkor.  Andremene has 1 other sibling at home.  Her parents are farmers and they grow corn, grains and beans.  The family lives in a 4 room home made of dirt, stick and tin.  They do not have running water at their home or a flush toilet, but do have an outhouse.  They get their water from a river that in close to their home.  Andremene traveled for 4 hours on a horse to arrive at the clinic.  The family’s average monthly income is around $57US.  She was started on the F-75 therapeutic milk and then graduated to the medika mamba program.

Andremene (1)

LOUDINIA

She is 15 months old and weighs 17 pounds.  She has 1 living sibling at home.  The family lives with extended family members and there are 13 people living in a 2 room home.  Both parents are farmers and grow beans in their garden.  They do not have running water at their home or a flush toilet, not even an outhouse.  The family gets their water from a source that is about a 30 minute walk from their home.  The family’s average monthly income is around $113US.  They traveled about 3 hours on a motorcycle to arrive at the clinic.  Her family thinks that she has kwashiorkor because the mama breastfed her for a few months after she was pregnant with another child.  She was started on the F-75 therapeutic milk and then graduated to the medika mamba program.

Loudinia (2)

MANIA

She is 8 days old and weighs 3 pounds 12 ounces.  Her mama is very ill could not make a trip to the hospital.  Mania was very jaundice when arriving and was severely dehydrated.  She had only had sugar water since birth. She has 2 other living siblings at home and 2 that have died when they were newborn babies.  Her parents are farmers and grow beans and pumpkins in their gardens.  The family of 4 lives in a 2 room home made of clay, sticks and tin.  They do not have running water at their home or a flush toilet, but do have an outhouse.  They get their water from a piped system  that is about a 15 minute walk from their home.   The family’s average monthly income is around $170US.  It took her papa 5 hours to make it to the clinic by foot and motocycle.

Maina (3)

after one week

Mania (1)

 NAFTALIE

She is  2.5 years old and weighs 19 pounds. (she has already lost 3 pounds of weight due to her edema).  She was referred to us by Children’s Health Ministries.  Both of her parent buy items in bulk and resell them at a higher price for a profit.  She has one other livings sibling at home. They family of 6 lives in a 2 room home made of sticks, clay and tin.  They do not have running water at their home, or a flush toilet, but do have an outhouse. The days she was admitted she has cornmeal to eat and the day before she had soup and coffee.  She has been showing signs of kwashiorkor since the month of Sept.  Her glucose levels were in the 40′s when admitted with a fever, vomiting and diarrhea.  Her family’s average monthly income is around $80US.  Her papa thinks that she is this sick because she does not eat well.

Nafatalie  (1)

NATALIE

She is 4 years old and weighs 21 pounds She was referred to us by  Community Health Initiative. She comes from a family of 6 siblings, 5 are living and 1 has died of fever and malnutrition.  Her parents are farmers and grow beans, corn and bananas.  The family of 7 lives in a 2 room home made of sticks, dirt and tin.  They do not have running water at their home or a flush toilet, but do have an outhouse. They get their water from a piped system that is about a 5 minute walk from their home.  She has been malnourished for a long time, her skin is splitting in some places and all of her hair has fallen out.  The day she was admitted she had some crackers to eat and the day before she had a plate of rice. Her families average monthly income is $34US.  Her mama say she has no idea why her daugher is this sick.  She was started in the F-75 therapeutic milk and then was transferred to the medika mamba program.

natalie #1 (1)

natalie #1 (3)

 NATALIE

She is 4 years old and weighs 20 pounds.  She was referred to us by  Community Health Initiative.  Both of her parents are farmers and grow beans and corn in their gardens.  She is the only living child in her family.  Three others had died of malnutrition.  The family of 3 lives in a 2 room home made of sticks, dirt and tin.  They do not have running water at their home or a flush toilet, not even an outhouse. The family gets their water from a source that is about a 5 minute walk from their home.  Her mama says she has had a stomach ache since birth and has been losing weight for a few months.  The day she was admitted she had fried flour balls to eat and the day before a plate of rice.  Her family’s average month income is around $45Us. She was started in the F-75 therapeutic milk and then transferred to the medika mamba program.

natalie #2 (2)

 

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